Category Archives: work ethic

Growing Up in the Midwest


Shaping of My Work Ethic

I have returned to the 160-acre farm that provided a wonderful childhood for my sister and me during the fifteen years my mother and father sharecropped the property for Mr. C. J. Artz (affectionately called Artzie Fartzie). I remember him driving his Studebaker out to the fields to watch us work.

th-3.jpeg  1949 Studebaker

Landowners seldom lent a hand in the physical labor. Mr. Artz was a sweet man and gave me the freedom to raise my baby beef and sheep without any rent for the use of his land or its products. Actually, He certainly realized the manual labor that the children of his sharecroppers provided. I don’t believe it entered my mind to complain about the hard work I did. “This isn’t fair” or “I am going to take this week off,” was never uttered. As I think about the laziness of so many children, I have to blame it on the parents for giving their children such an option. I never heard my parents complain about our employer. I am thankful for this because it enabled me to work and serve without resentments. I remember one angry response from my father when I complained about helping him work on a piece of broken equipment on a humid day. The sweat poured off both of us. The salt leaked into my eyes and in pain I said, “I hate this.”

Dad quickly responded, “Nope. I think you should go to the house, I will do this!”

When I retreated with the desire to stay, he said, “Go, go now.”

I rebutted, “But I can help.”

“No, I don’t need your complaining. Go play.”

I was wounded. I was wounded and healed forever. This was a transitional moment in my life. I would never leave my father under those conditions again. I am so thankful that my parents cared enough to block any ideas I might have had to be a lazy complaining bum of a child. Their desire to form a productive child has made it easier to make a difference in this world and to bring happiness and meaning to others. Our folks were not our pals; they were our parents.

These were laborious years—most of the work was not done voluntarily; instead we were obligated by our station in life, even though I didn’t realize it at the time. I can still feel the endless fatigue and perspiration from a long day with a hoe cutting weeds out of the soybean rows. We protected ourselves from the blisters and calluses by using leather gloves. There were also the scratches on my neck and chest and aching muscles from lifting several hundred bales of hay into the barn loft that readily rest in the recesses of my mind. Those were happy years despite the illnesses and hospitalizations that my parents faced and conquered. My father’s heart attack, numerous back surgeries, farm accidents that required multiple stiches, and annual bouts with poison ivy are better relived as a memory than during the times that the incidents rocked our family. My parents bent in the wind, but they never broke.